About ADAC

 

The Aerospace and Defense Alliance of California (ADAC) is affiliated with the California Manufacturers and Technology Association (CMTA) and was formed to address specific state policy issues affecting the aerospace and defense industry, specifically. California is a global leader in aerospace, aviation, defense, space science research and development (R&D), and advanced manufacturing. California’s aerospace industry supports more than 511,000 high-paying jobs, generates more than $100 billion in annual economic activity, and generates $7 billion in state and local taxes. 

California's Aerospace Industry Creates

High-Paying Jobs

Percent of All Manufacturing Jobs

Billion Dollars in Annual Economic Activity

Billion Dollars in State & Local Taxes

Watch highlights from June 5, 2024 in the video above.

California Aerospace Day 2024

In partnership with Boeing, Lockheed Martin and Amazon Project Kuiper, the Aerospace Defense Alliance of California (ADAC) part of the California Manufacturers & Technology Association (CMTA) hosted its second California Aerospace Day. The one-day event brought together a cross-section of California’s largest aerospace companies with state legislators to showcase the industry’s impact on the Golden State’s economy.

 

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PRESS RELEASES

 

Hypersonic Research Company Speeds Into CMTA Membership

Sacramento, Calif. – The California Manufacturers & Technology Association (CMTA) welcomed the hypersonic flight-testing company, Stratolaunch to the organization today. "Flying at MACH 5 sounds like something straight out of Top Gun, but it's part of regular...

EPA: Support our manufacturers instead of harming them

OPINION – As California goes, so goes the nation. This saying about how California is a leader in regulations – particularly standards that promote a cleaner environment – has never been truer than today. And while it’s usually a point of pride, there are out-of-touch...

Manufacturing Minute: CHIPS Act Funding, Satellite Contract & Coolest Thing Made in California

Find out what’s happening in the manufacturing industry on this week’s Manufacturing Minute with Ananda Rochita.

⚙️ What Northrop Grumman & Lockheed Martin will make with a new $1.5B shared contract.
⚙️ Just how many CHIPS Act Funding applications the government received.
⚙️ What to know about the Coolest Thing Made in California competition.
⚙️ Are you registered for CMTA’s 2nd Annual Foundation Golf Tournament?

Click on the photo below to watch the latest manufacturing news.

Hypersonic Research Company Speeds Into CMTA Membership

Hypersonic Research Company Speeds Into CMTA Membership

Sacramento, Calif. – The California Manufacturers & Technology Association (CMTA) welcomed the hypersonic flight-testing company, Stratolaunch to the organization today.

“Flying at MACH 5 sounds like something straight out of Top Gun, but it’s part of regular hypersonic testing for our new member. Stratolaunch is pushing the boundaries of high-speed solutions,” said Lance Hastings, CMTA’s CEO & President. “We look forward to working with Stratolaunch alongside our Aerospace and Defense Alliance of California (ADAC) members.   

Stratolaunch designs, manufactures, and launches aerospace vehicles to enable reusable and routine hypersonic testing. Stratolaunch’s goal is to fulfill critical national need to test and develop hypersonic technologies. Stratolaunch’s unique air-launch system uses the world’s largest aircraft as a mobile launch platform to deploy high-speed vehicles into the hypersonic environment.

“Stratolaunch is pleased to join CMTA’s conglomerate of technical experts, as we support the national imperative for hypersonic research via flight demonstrations,” said Dr. Zachary Krevor, Stratolaunch’s CEO & President. “We look forward to working directly with industry professionals to advance our hypersonic mission and the aerospace industry’s unique business requirements.”

Stratolaunch Roc N351SL Mojave Talon

Stratolaunch Roc N351SL Mojave Talon

Stratolaunch is headquartered at the epicenter for civilian aircraft testing and development at Mojave Air & Space Port at Rutan Field in Mojave, California. Stratolaunch conducts manufacturing, testing, and operations of its carrier aircraft. It also has locations in Seattle, Washington, Washington, D.C., Colorado, and Indiana.

Stratolaunch recently expanded its launch fleet by acquiring Virgin Orbit’s modified Boeing 747, which will allow the team to increase its flight test capacity and global service footprint.

 

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About CMTA

The California Manufacturers & Technology Association has advocated for pro-growth laws and regulations before the California legislature and administrative agencies since 1918. The total output from manufacturing in California is $300 billion per year, roughly 10 percent of the total economic output of the state. Manufacturers employ 1.3 million Californians paying wages more than $25,000 higher than other non-farm employers in the state. For more information, visit CMTA’s website.

About Stratolaunch

Stratolaunch’s mission is to advance high-speed technology through innovative design, manufacturing, and operation of world-class aerospace vehicles. For the latest news and information, visit www.stratolaunch.com and follow us on FacebookTwitterLinkedIn, and Instagram.

EPA: Support our manufacturers instead of harming them

OPINION – As California goes, so goes the nation.

This saying about how California is a leader in regulations – particularly standards that promote a cleaner environment – has never been truer than today. And while it’s usually a point of pride, there are out-of-touch national regulations being planned by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that would significantly imperil our manufacturing base if the agency successfully implements them. If that happens, our manufacturing sector’s decline would harm not just us, but the entire country.

The EPA has proposed a change to the regulations for a particulate matter called PM2.5 that is a common byproduct of manufacturing operations. PM2.5 has been regulated for decades and the manufacturing industry has been able to innovate to both comply with regulations. However, this new regulatory proposal surrounding PM2.5 comes at a time when the impact of implementation would cause severe and far-reaching consequences.

California’s manufacturing base is comparable to some countries. There are 35,000 firms supporting 1.2 million jobs that generates more than $300 billion annually. We have the number one shipping port in the nation for the massive number of exports we send overseas. Over the last three decades, California has become a leader in high-tech sectors such as aerospace, electronics, electric vehicle manufacturing, and even advances in the food and beverage industries. In fact, 16% of aerospace jobs and 28% of IT and analytical product manufacturing jobs in the country are in California. And as a result, California’s manufacturing companies are among the best and the most environmentally conscious in the world.

A new regulatory proposal surrounding PM2.5 comes at a time when the impact of implementation would cause severe and far-reaching consequences.

Because of California’s large manufacturing footprint, our state would be impacted more than any other state. A recent study from the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) details that, if PM2.5 regulations were to tighten, it would create a total economic exposure of more than $30 billion and threaten an estimated 119,000 jobs. That is something the EPA ought to consider in its rule-making process so decisions are not made in a silo.

It’s no secret to anyone reading this that California’s economy got walloped by the pandemic and subsequent supply chain crisis, and these potential compounding issues from this onerous regulation certainly wouldn’t help in our continued recovery. Every sector in the state from agricultural to hospitality to manufacturing struggled mightily, but we proved our resilience and are continuing to recover. But that progress to full recovery will come to an abrupt stop if the EPA’s shortsighted and unnecessary PM2.5 regulation is allowed to move forward.

Even the EPA itself says that the levels of PM2.5 have decreased by 44% since 2000, which means that the current standards are working. In fact, six common airborne particles that are regulated under NAAQS have decreased by 78% between 1970 and 2020. California’s manufacturers are proud to be leaders in this effort, and they will continue to play an integral role in a cleaner environment.

The California Manufacturers & Technology Association believes in a balanced approach to regulations, including those that support cleaner air. But this new rule could cause significant challenges for manufacturers seeking permits for expansions. Additionally, the proposal is likely to negatively impact the construction of new infrastructure projects as funded in the bipartisan infrastructure bill.  Of course, regulations are necessary and improving our air quality is of the utmost importance, but overly burdensome regulations, like the PM2.5 proposal under consideration, harm our members, their employees, their customers, and, by extension, our communities.

The current PM2.5 regulations are working – we know this because the EPA’s own data tells us that. There is no need to push up the regulatory schedule and cause undue harm to companies that are just now finding their footing from the pandemic and fervently trying to ward off another economic slide. We ask that our elected leaders tell the EPA to stop the regulations under consideration and let our manufacturers continue driving a strong economy.

-This OpEd was written by Lance Hastings, CMTA’s CEO & President, and was first published in Capitol Weekly on July 22, 2023.

California’s Aerospace Companies Celebrate Announcement of NASA Naming First Crew Under Artemis

Photo Courtesy: NASA

Sacramento, Ca. – The California Manufacturers & Technology Association (CMTA) and the Aerospace and Defense Alliance of California (ADAC) celebrates the unveiling of the first crew under Artemis II. NASA and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) announced the four astronauts who will venture around the Moon on Artemis II, the first crewed mission on NASA’s path to establishing a long-term presence at the Moon for science and exploration.
The crew assignments are: Commander Reid Wiseman, Pilot Victor Glover, Mission Specialist 1 Christina Hammock Koch, and Mission Specialist 2 Jeremy Hansen.
“This is an exciting journey as we are going back to the Moon,” said Lance Hastings, CEO and President of CMTA. “Thousands of people and our California manufacturers are working toward the future of innovation in space. Our astronauts are representing the next generation and a new era of exploration.”
The flight was built upon the success of the uncrewed Artemis I mission completed in December 2022. The Artemis program is critical to the aerospace industry and to California’s economy.

NASA’s prime contractor for the Orion spacecraft is Lockheed Martin. Orion is the first spacecraft capable of carrying humans on long-duration missions in deep space.

NASA’s prime Space Launch System (SLS) contractors include Aerojet Rocketdyne, The Boeing Company, and Northrop Grumman. SLS is a rocket capable of launching humans, habitats, and support systems directly into deep space. It is designed to be strong and flexible for crew, cargo, or science missions.

According to a report and a recent study by PwC, California’s aerospace, aviation, and defense industry supports more than 511,000 high-paying jobs, generates more than $100 billion in annual economic activity, and generates $7 billion in state and local taxes. Additionally, the industry supply chain consists of thousands of other small businesses, many minority-owned, located throughout all 58 counties. America’s aerospace industry originated in California and today remains the largest industry in the state.

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About CMTA:
The California Manufacturers & Technology Association has advocated for pro-growth laws and regulations before the California legislature and administrative agencies since 1918. Total output from manufacturing in California is $300 billion per year, roughly 10 percent of the total economic output of the state. Manufacturers employ 1.3 million Californians paying wages more than $25,000 higher than other non-farm employers in the state. For more information, visit the CMTA website.

About ADAC:
The Aerospace and Defense Alliance of California (ADAC) is a targeted policy committee formed in 2021 to address, manage and leverage policy issues affecting the aerospace and defense industries. ADAC supports policies that enable the industry to make long-planned capital investments, hire more people, improve facilities, retain vital small business suppliers, and create educational and career pathways for the future workforce.

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